Reading Level Chart

Booksource knows that reading levels can serve as a helpful tool for educators. Use this Reading Level Chart to better understand how the common leveling systems correlate to one another and match students to texts that can be read with success. To start shopping for books by reading level, click on your desired Grade, Guided Reading or Lexile Level below.

Grade
Level
Guided
Reading
Lexile
Level
DRA
Level
Reading
Recovery
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Booksource relies only on reputable sources for our leveling information. Each reading level system is designed independently, using various metrics to determine grade level targets. Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the levels presented.

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Guided Reading is based on standards developed by Irene Fountas and Gay Su Pinnell. When leveling a title, Fountas & Pinnell consider factors such as text difficulty, vocabulary and developmental appropriateness. For example, a level P book is appropriate for grade three students in terms of both content and complexity.

When necessary, Booksource relies on publisher guided reading levels. Every effort is made to ensure that reading levels designated by publishers are comparable to Fountas & Pinnell reading levels.

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Lexile levels are determined through quantitative evaluation of sentence length and difficulty. Theme and developmental appropriateness are not considered. Lexile measures are from @2011 Metametrics, Inc., and appear by permission with all rights reserved. Lexile and related marks are registered trademarks of MetaMetrics, Inc.

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Developmental Reading Level Assessment, better known as DRA, was developed by Joetta Beaver and published by Celebration Press, 1977. DRA is a method of assessing and documenting achievement within a literature-based instructional program.

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Developed by Marie M. Clay in the 1970s as a short intervention program, Reading Recovery helps low achieving first-graders reach grade level standards through one-on-one tutoring. Reading Recovery is a registered trademark of The Ohio State University.

Emergent
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Books for emergent readers tell simple stories, with one to two lines per page. They follow patterns and use repeated vocabulary. Emergent readers “read” from picture cues, and from hearing the story read aloud. Concepts are familiar.

Emergent readers are developing an understanding of the alphabet and will recognize beginning letters and some sight words. They can attend to short read alouds featuring familiar narratives and concepts. Emergent readers may “pretend” read, as they recount a familiar story or rely heavily on picture cues.

A-1
1
2-3
2
4
3-4
6
5-6
Early
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Books for early readers contain more pages and longer sentences. There is more variety in sentence structure. They include high-frequency words and picture cues to provide support while introducing early readers to new vocabulary. Concepts are familiar.

Early readers start to read simple stories and can sound out new words with one or two syllables. They will recognize and read some high-frequency words and begin self-monitoring for some comprehension. They predict words based on beginning sounds and picture cues.

8
7-8
10
9-10
12
11-12
14
13-14
16
15-17
18
18-20
Transitional
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Books for transitional readers include a larger core of frequently-used words, new vocabulary and longer words that require chunking. These books include text features and are on varied topics and from multiple genres. Transitional books can be short chapter books or more complex picture books. Concepts are less familiar and the text encourages readers to make connections.

Transitional readers have developed several reading strategies for decoding and monitoring comprehension. They read longer, more complex texts, including narratives and informational texts, with fluency and phrasing. Their rate of reading has increased, and they are transitioning from reading to decode to reading to comprehend and learn.

20
18-20
24
28
30
34
38
Fluent
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Books for fluent readers come from different genres and sources. The text is longer and more complex and requires sustained understanding over a few days or weeks of reading. Text features are used to gain and infer meaning. Fluent readers read for purposes such as enjoyment or for learning. Many concepts are new, as fluent readers read to gain new ideas and explore new perspectives.

Fluent readers read fluently with phrasing, inflection and expression. They read independently and silently. They will read for longer durations and maintain comprehension of the text over several days or weeks. They set purposes for reading, and react to text. Fluent readers understand that reading will build knowledge, and influence ideas and attitudes.

40
50
60
Proficient
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Proficient readers continue to read for a variety of purposes, including learning or enjoyment. Books are specific to subject matter, such as the sciences or the humanities. Text is in different styles and lengths and includes different genres, contents and authors to meet a range of self-set purposes for reading.

Proficient readers read across a wide variety of materials and for multiple purposes. They make adjustments to their reading style based on the text and their purpose. They read regularly, for enjoyment and knowledge, and synthesize information from reading.

Due to mature content, the Z+ titles should be reserved for high school and adult readers. Reader discretion is advised.

70
80